BOOKS: ‘When Brooklyn Was Queer’, telling the story of the borough’s LGBT past

In a new book, Hugh Ryan explores the untold history of queer life in Brooklyn from the 1850s forward, revealing some unlikely truths.

One recurring theme in his research that fascinated Ryan was how Brooklyn’s rise from rural backwater to New York’s second city mirrored the rise in interest in sex and gender studies and – sadly – the rise in homophobia, bigotry and abuse.

Historian explains why racist Trump supporters are not aberration in the GOP

The political vehicle enabling Trump’s rise to power has been the Republican Party. How could that have happened? As historians know momentous change does not occur overnight. Seeds are planted and cultivated before a flowering takes place. That happened in the Republican Party.

Why the privileged white-male now bombs at the box office

As Esquire magazine discovered a little too late, nobody wants to hear about “what it’s like to grow up white, middle class, and male” in today’s America – especially not during Black History Month. Esquire’s current cover story is about a Trump-supporting 17-year-old from Wisconsin in the era of #MeToo and toxic masculinity, and has been met with Twitter outrage and conservative counter-outrage. “Well, they don’t yet have a middle-class, teen, white boy month,” observed one Fox News pundit. Perhaps they should go to the movies a bit more. It’s been middle-class, teen, white boy month there for years, but now nobody wants to hear about it.

CANADA: Sound of native languages in Parliament marks win for Indigenous People

INTRO:

When the Canadian MP Robert-Falcon Ouellette stood in the House of Commons in June 2017 to deliver a speech on the country’s epidemic of violence against indigenous women, few of his colleagues could understand him.

Ouellette spoke in the Cree indigenous language, and – despite a request for English or French interpreters – no simultaneous translation was provided. His speech was only the second time an indigenous language had been officially spoken in the 151-year history of the house.

The Golden Age Of Blacks In Television: The Late 1960s

“Golden Age” is a term to label that period in the history of a nation, movement, artistic medium or the like during which its greatest achievements were realized. It is not an absolute term since it does not intend to describe the best possible epoch. That being the case, there can be no doubt that for African Americans in television, the last half of the 1960s was a Golden Age.